Azad Bonni, MD, PhD

Edison Professor of Neurobiology

Identifying key mechanisms and principles that govern neuronal connectivity in brain development and disease Read More

Email: bonni@wustl.edu
Lab Phone: 314-362-3033
Website: Bonni Lab
Lab Location: McDonnell Sciences 8th Floor
Keywords: neuronal morphogenesis, synapse development, transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms, ubiquitin-signaling pathways, brain development, cerebellum, intellectual disability, autism spectrum disorders

Identifying key mechanisms and principles that govern neuronal connectivity in brain development and disease

The primary goal of research in the Bonni laboratory is to identify the principles and mechanisms that govern the assembly and function of neural circuits in the mammalian brain and to determine how these mechanisms are deregulated in neurological diseases including intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders. The Bonni lab has discovered some of the first fundamental transcriptional, epigenetic, and ubiquitin-signaling networks that govern neuronal morphogenesis and synaptic connectivity in the mammalian brain, thus establishing the field of cell-intrinsic regulation of neuronal connectivity.

The Bonni lab continues to make advances in this field and is characterizing in other studies how deregulation of cell-intrinsic mechanisms of neuronal morphogenesis and connectivity contributes to neurodevelopmental disorders of cognition. The Bonni lab deploys a diverse set of tools and approaches from biochemistry, molecular biology, genetics, imaging and electrophysiology to the study of circuit assembly and function in the mouse and rat brain.

Research in the Bonni laboratory is organized in three major areas:

  • Epigenetic and transcriptional control of synaptic connectivity
  • Regulation of neuronal connectivity by ubiquitin signaling
  • Deregulation of neuronal connectivity in intellectual disability and autism

Updated June 2015

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