Ray (150x150)

Wilson (Zack) Ray, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurological Surgery

Development of innovative technology targeting neuroprosthetic interfaces Read More

Email: rayz@wudosis.wustl.edu
Lab Phone: (314) 362-3570
Website:
Lab Location: North Building 3rd Floor
Keywords: neuroprosthetics, spinal cord injury, diffusion tensor imaging, peripheral nerve regeneration, nanotechnology, tissue engineering

Development of innovative technology targeting neuroprosthetic interfaces

Macro-Sieve electrode--platform for peripheral motor restoration.

The primary focus of my lab will be strategies to improve nerve regeneration and the development of innovative technology targeting peripheral nerve/neuroprosthetic interfaces.  My laboratory will be designed to employ an interdisciplinary approach to effectively engineer novel technological platforms, medical devices, and clinical therapies with significant potential for clinical translation. Through the utilization of diverse experiences and backgrounds in the fields of tissue engineering, device design, biomedical engineering, nanotechnology, and neurosurgery.  I intend to develop novel clinical solutions and medical devices capable of positively impacting both clinical practice and patient outcomes.

My clinical interests lie in the management of both acute and chronic spinal cord injuries(SCI).   New imaging modalities and techniques that improve our understanding of tissue damage following a SCI injury could improve our ability to identify patients with intact functional connectivity and refine current management strategies in patients with significant SCIs and, more importantly, provide a tool for predicting functional recovery.  Another area of interest is, the utility of nerve transfer surgery in patients with chronic SCIs.  Nerve transfers can potentially provide improved hand function, bladder control, and protective lower extremity sensation in patients with SCI.

I believe that both my laboratory and clinical research will lead to improved function and quality of life in patients with both peripheral nerve and SCI.


Updated February 2014

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