In military personnel, no difference between blast- and nonblast-related concussions

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From the WUSTL Newsroom…

Explosions are the most common cause of traumatic brain injuries in veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. A new study shows that military personnel with mild brain trauma related to such blasts had outcomes similar to those with mild brain injury from other causes, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

However, nearly 80 percent of patients in both categories of brain trauma suffered moderate to severe overall disability within a year after injury.

The analysis appears June 16 in JAMA Neurology.

“We are interested in whether there are fundamental differences between the effects of concussions caused by a blast versus other kinds of blunt head trauma,” said senior author David L. Brody, MD, PhD, associate professor of neurology. “This study and others make us a bit skeptical of the notion that the long-term effects of blast injury to the brain are somehow unique.

For the complete article, click here.

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Posted on June 20, 2014
Posted in: Axon Injury & Repair, HPAN, Neurodegeneration, News Authors: