For malnourished children, a new type of microbiome-directed food boosts growth

New food is designed to nurture healthy gut microbes Read More

From the WashU Newsroom

A new type of therapeutic food specifically designed to repair the gut microbiomes of malnourished children is superior to standard therapy in promoting growth, according to the results of a proof-of-concept clinical trial conducted in Bangladesh.

The study, conducted by an interdisciplinary team of researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research in Dhaka, Bangladesh (icddr,b), was designed to supplement the diet of malnourished children with a formulation that contains locally available, culturally acceptable foods selected based on the ability of the ingredients to boost key growth-promoting gut microbes. The work supports the notion that healthy growth of infants and children is closely linked to healthy development of their gut microbial communities — or microbiomes — after birth.

The results of the study are published online April 7 in The New England Journal of Medicine.

Childhood malnutrition is a major global health challenge, affecting over 150 million children under the age of 5 worldwide, with a disproportionate impact in South Asia and Sub-Saharan Africa, according to the World Health Organization. The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic is further exacerbating this problem. Numerous studies have shown that malnutrition is not due to food insecurity alone but instead reflects a combination of factors, including an important role for the gut microbiome, which fails to develop properly during the first two years of life in malnourished children.

“Malnutrition has proven extraordinarily difficult to treat — standard calorie-dense therapeutic foods have been shown to prevent the deaths of malnourished children, but have been ineffective in overcoming growth stunting and other damaging effects of malnutrition, including impaired brain development, bone growth and immune function,” said senior author Jeffrey I. Gordon, MD, the Dr. Robert J. Glaser Distinguished University Professor and director of the Edison Family Center for Genome Sciences & Systems Biology at the School of Medicine. “In an attempt to address this problem, we are investigating whether repairing the poorly developed microbial communities of malnourished children will impact their growth. This is the first time that a microbiome-directed therapeutic food has been compared with a standard therapy in malnourished children; moreover, it produced a superior rate of weight gain, the key primary clinical outcome of the trial.”

Visit the Source for the complete story.

Posted on April 7, 2021
Posted in: Neurogenetics & Transcriptomics, News Authors: