Protein linked to intellectual disability has complex role

Finding therapies for fragile X may depend on understanding the many ways protein’s loss affects brain Read More

From the WashU Newsroom

Fragile X syndrome, the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability, is due to a genetic mutation that largely eliminates the fragile X protein, a critical element of normal brain development and function.

The fragile X protein modulates neuronal functions, including neurons within the so-called GABAergic system that regulates the activity of neural circuits. The protein’s absence throws that system off kilter, and so far, experimental therapies designed to reset the system by compensating for the missing protein’s functions have not been effective in clinical trials.

Now, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a previously unknown role for the fragile X protein in the GABAergic system. They have shown that the protein regulates the opening and closing of the GABA-A receptor in neurons from the brain’s memory center, thereby influencing how such neurons process information, a central part of learning and memory.

The findings, published May 17 in Cell Reports, indicate that the fragile X protein’s role is more complex than previously thought, and that finding effective therapies may depend on a more nuanced understanding of the myriad ways loss of this protein affects the brain.

“People think that since fragile X is related to the loss of a single protein, it is a simple disease that we can quickly understand and fix,” said senior author Vitaly A. Klyachko, PhD, a professor of cell biology and physiology. “But the reality is that the more we study, the more we understand it’s not simple at all. I think part of the reason why clinical trials fail may be because we don’t really understand what’s going on very well. It is possible that we need to fix more than one mechanism at the same time for patients to see any meaningful improvement.”

People with fragile X syndrome have intellectual or learning disabilities, social and behavioral problems, and characteristic physical features such as large ears and long faces. They also often are noted for their friendly dispositions. The condition affects about 1 in 7,000 males and 1 in 11,000 females, with males typically more severely affected. The fragile X gene is located on the X chromosome, so females inherit one good and one bad copy of the gene, but males have only the bad copy. There are no treatments that address the underlying cause.

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Posted on May 18, 2022
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