Study in mice suggests sleep problems may be early sign of Alzheimer’s

Holtzman lab shows correlation between first indicators of brain plaques and disruption of daily fluctuations in amyloid beta Read More

From the WUSTL Newsroom

Sleep disruptions may be among the earliest indicators of Alzheimer’s disease, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report Sept. 5 in Science Translational Medicine.

Working in a mouse model, the researchers found that when the first signs of Alzheimer’s plaques appear in the brain, the normal sleep-wake cycle is significantly disrupted.

“If sleep abnormalities begin this early in the course of human Alzheimer’s disease, those changes could provide us with an easily detectable sign of pathology,” says senior author David M. Holtzman, MD, the Andrew B. and Gretchen P. Jones Professor and head of Washington University’s Department of Neurology. “As we start to treat Alzheimer’s patients before the onset of dementia, the presence or absence of sleep problems may be a rapid indicator of whether the new treatments are succeeding.”

Holtzman’s laboratory was among the first to link sleep problems and Alzheimer’s through studies of sleep in mice genetically altered to develop Alzheimer’s plaques as they age. In a study published in 2009, he showed that brain levels of a primary ingredient of the plaques naturally rise when healthy young mice are awake and drop after they go to sleep. Depriving the mice of sleep disrupted this cycle and accelerated the development of brain plaques.

A similar rising and falling of the plaque component, a protein called amyloid beta, was later detected in the cerebrospinal fluid of healthy humans studied by co-author Randall Bateman, MD, the Charles F. and Joanne Knight Distinguished Professor of Neurology at Washington University.

The new research, led by Jee Hoon Roh, MD, PhD, a neurologist and postdoctoral fellow in Holtzman’s laboratory, shows that when the first indicators of brain plaques appear, the natural fluctuations in amyloid beta levels stop in both mice and humans.

For more from Michael C. Purdy of the WUSTL Newsroom, click here.

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Posted on September 10, 2012
Posted in: HPAN, Neurodegeneration, News Authors: